Typical loudspeaker cabinets have pronounced structural resonances which are very audible and reduce the speaker’s ‘signal-to-noise ratio’. At FinkTeam we take this aspect of loudspeaker performance very seriously because we know that a quiet cabinet allows the reproduction of low-level detail in a recording which is otherwise swamped by spurious cabinet output. Coloration and time smear are reduced, stereo image focus is improved, and listener fatigue avoided.

The design emphasis is on panel damping. It is impossible to force all the panel bending resonances above the passband so instead they are damped to reduce their amplitude to below audibility. This is achieved using a multilayer construction that combines multi-thickness MDF panels with a damping layer whose internal friction converts vibration into heat. FinkTeam developed algorithms help specify ideal material thicknesses to achieve the best results, but the ultimate determination is made by subjective assessment.

Enthusiasts spend thousands buying quieter equipment – products that seem to generate (or not in fact) more space between notes to ultimately have the effect considerably reduced by noisy loudspeaker cabinets. FinkTeam’s COMSOL modelling and Laser Scanning allow prediction and measurement of the results of cabinet designs.

An example of this was the cabinet opening to mount the 10.25 inch mid/bass driver. Even with the drivers rigidly mounted there was some unwanted vibration. Almost invisible to the touch test it was obvious under the laser scanner. A solid metal ring behind the driver mounting solved the problem and hence increased the signal to noise ratio.